Current Exhibition          Past Exhibitions          Inventory          Estates          Post-War Focus          Reviews          Contact

1884              William Johnson L'Engle Jr. is born in Jacksonville, Florida.

1889              Lucy Stelle Brown is born in New York City, New York.

1906              William graduates from Yale University with a degree in Naval Architecture.

1907-1908     William studies at the Art Students League in New York. Blanche Lazzell and Georgia O'Keeffe are also
                       students at this time.

1909              William goes to France where he will spend five years. He studies at the Académie Julian with Raphael
                       Collin and in the studio of Louis Biloul. Lucy Brown spends the summer in Provincetown studying at
                       Charles Hawthorne's Cape Cod School of Art.

1910              William travels to Spain with friends and fellows artists George Biddle and Waldo Pierce. The three
                       Americans study in Madrid and copy paintings by Diego Velázquez at the Prado Museum.

1911-1912     Lucy studies at the Art Students League in New York City.

1913              William enrolls at the École des Beaux-Arts in January where he studies with Jean-Paul Laurens. Lucy
                      goes to Paris to attend the Académie Julian. William and Lucy meet.

1914              William and Lucy marry.

1915              The L'Engles seek safety from the war in Marseilles, where they have their first daughter, Madeleine
                      (Mady), in March. The family returns to New York by the summer.

1916              The family spends the first of many summers in Provincetown. Lucy studies with C.W. Hawthorne
                      (through the summer of 1918). The couple becomes good friends with William and Marguerite Zorach,
                      who are also spending their first summer in Provincetown. Each of the young couples identifies the Cubist
                      spirit in the other and may have known each other from Paris. Marsden Hartley has a successful summer
                      of painting in Provincetown as well. The L'Engles become involved with the theater group, The
                      Provincetown Players, who were in their second season.

                      The L'Engles visit Montross Gallery's exhibition of French Cubists in April, which includes work by Jean
                      Crotti, Marcel Duchamp, Albert Gleizes, and Jean Metzinger.

1917              Birth of the couple's second daughter, Camille (Cammie) in New York City. William joins The
                      Beachcombers Club of Provincetown, a gentlemen's club dedicated to art and literature.

1918              Lucy first exhibits at the annual exhibition of the Provincetown Art Association (PAA). She exhibits four
                      works titled: Over the Bay; The Black Shawl; The Yellow Scarf; Portuguese Girl. She establishes a studio
                      at Players' Wharf. William has a studio in a house away from the activity.

                      Lucy and William each exhibit two paintings at the Society of Independent Artists and again in 1921-1923
                      and 1925. Lucy exhibits alone in 1920 and 1936.

                      William exhibits a portrait in the National Academy of Design's annual exhibition in March-April.

1919              William first exhibits at the PAA's annual exhibition and his portrait of a fisherman Old Ben is noted in
                      American Art News (July 12, 1919). Lucy exhibits a portrait and a still life. Lucy and Marguerite Zorach
                      cause a local stir when they arrive for the summer in Provincetown with their hair bobbed, the local
                      newspaper takes note.

1920              William has an exhibition of 49 paintings, including 18 portraits, 13 figurative works, and 18 landscapes at
                      Kingore Galleries, 668 Fifth Avenue, New York, from November 30 through December 14. The exhibition
                      is organized by Christian Brinton and is fulsomely reviewed in The New York Times and The New York
                      Tribune on December 5th. The Tribune calls William "a robust, invigorating type, decisive in his color,
                      setting his forms boldly upon the canvas and showing skill in the definition of traits of character." Since
                      the L'Engles return from Europe in 1915, William spends the winters in New York as a portrait painter and
                      the list of portraits at the Kingore exhibition included the Brown family, the Iselin Family, Rex Fincke
                      (tennis player), and Wilbur Daniel Steele (author).

                      William exhibits The Decision and Lucy exhibits Dream and Sails at the PAA's annual exhibition.

1921              William and Lucy both exhibit in the PAA's annual exhibition. Lucy's work is singled out in American Art
                      News (August 20, 1921). Lucy creates the costumes for the Provincetown Players production of Jig Cook's
                      The Spring. [According to Cheryl Black, The Women of Provincetown, 2002, p.125]

                      Given Christian Brinton's involvement with the Société Anonyme, the L'Engles likely visit the group's
                      galleries on 47th Street in its first year of exhibitions, which include artists Marcel Duchamp, Kurt
                      Schwitters, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Marsden Hartley, and Joseph Stella.

1922              Lucy has an exhibition of 18 modernist paintings at the Art Center Building in New York, 65 East 56th
                      Street. The exhibition is reviewed in American Art News (March 4, 1922) and quotes Lucy describing her
                      paintings as "a play of forms and colors - imaginative rather than realistic - emphasizing the abstract."

                      Lucy and William participate in the PAA's annual exhibition. American Art News (July 15, 1922) notes,
                      "The Modernists have been given a generous space, William and Marguerite Zorach, Agnes Weinrich, Karl
                      Knaths, William and Lucy L'Engle, and J. Floyd Clymer showing individualistic works."

                      William and Lucy exhibit at the Salons of America (which they do again in 1925 and 1934, Lucy exhibits
                      without William in 1931). Amidst the modernists, Lucy's Quilts is singled out in American Art News
                      (October 21, 1922) for its "highly personal way of looking at white houses."

1923              The L'Engles spend the summer in Cavalaire, a seaside town in the South of France, with fellow
                      Provincetowners, the authors Hutchins Hapgood and Neith Boyce. Albert Gleizes and his wife, who also
                      have a house in Cavalaire, are regular visitors to the L'Engles' rented home. In the fall the L'Engles go to
                      Paris so Lucy can formally study with Gleizes through the winter of 1924.

1924              The L'Engles acquire the Shebnah Rich House on Long Nook Road in Truro. William exhibits
                      Mediterranean Fisherman and Lucy exhibits Cagnes at the PAA's annual exhibition.

1925              Lucy becomes a founding member of the New York Society of Women Artists (NYSWA). Other
                      Provincetown members included: Agnes Weinrich, Blanche Lazzell, Ellen Ravenscroft, and Marguerite
                      Zorach, who becomes the group's first president. The membership is limited to 30 artists.

                      William serves on the jury for the PAA's annual exhibition. Neither L'Engle exhibits work in the exhibition.

                      Lucy is included in the exhibition Exposition International d'Art d'Aujourd'hui (International Exposition of
                      Art of Today) which opens in December in Paris. The exhibition organized by Polish painter Victor
                      Poznanski, a student of Gleizes, shows the international spread of Cubism. Léger, Gleizes, Picasso, Arp,
                      Ernst, and Miró participate. The exhibition includes the work of 60 artists from many nations. The
                      Americans were the third most represented country with six artists: Blanche Lazzell, Patrick Henry Bruce,
                      Florence Henri, Lucy L'Engle, Gerald Murphy, and E. Ambrose Webster. Lucy exhibits Panneau pour salle
                      de musique
(Panel for a Music Room).

1926              NYSWA has its first exhibition in April at the Anderson Galleries in New York. William serves on the jury
                      for the PAA's annual exhibition. Lucy's painting Street is reproduced in The New York Times's coverage of
                      the group exhibition.

1927              William and Lucy serve on the jury and exhibit in The First Modernist Exhibition of the PAA in July. Lucy
                      exhibits two abstract still lifes and William exhibits a circus scene.

                      Lucy exhibits in the NYSWA's second annual exhibition in March. Her painting Lady Slippers is reviewed in
                      The New York Times. She is elected an officer of the group, a role she maintains through 1934.

1928              William is elected a trustee of the PAA. Both William and Lucy serve on the jury for the PAA's Modernist
                      annual exhibition, which takes place in July. Lucy creates the cover for the exhibition catalogue- a
                      Gleizes-influenced composition. William exhibits a circus subject and Lucy exhibits a painting of Diana.
                      Each work is noted in The New York Times coverage of the July exhibition.

                      William exhibits at the Corcoran Gallery of Art's biennial (which he also does in 1939).

                      The New York Times writes of Lucy's application of Cubist theories in the NYSWA exhibition: "Lucy L'Engle
                      painting a dressing table, with a mirror, in the mirror a face, and beyond, a window through which is seen
                      a tall building, succeeds quite remarkably in keeping everything in its separate plane without insistence
                      on planar perspective." (April 29, 1928)

1929              William and Lucy both serve on the jury for the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition.

                      William has an exhibition of paintings at the Woman's University Club, New York in November. It is
                      reviewed in The New York Times (November 10, 1929).

1930              William and Lucy serve on the jury for the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition. William and Karl Knaths
                      hang the exhibition. Each L'Engle exhibits two works.

                      William and Lucy exhibit in Provincetown Group Show at GRD Gallery in New York in February. The
                      exhibition is organized by Agnes Weinrich and includes Charles Demuth, Oliver Chaffee, Karl Knaths, the
                      Zorachs, Jack Tworkov, Janice Biala, Niles Spencer, and E. Ambrose Webster.

                      Lucy is one of seven artists (including Marguerite Zorach) of the NYSWA to be invited to exhibit at the Art
                      Association of Newport in July.

1931              Lucy participates in a group exhibition at Weyhe Gallery with paintings and drawings.

                      William serves on a small jury for the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition and exhibits Figure Composition.
                      Lucy exhibits three works: Grotesque, Dan in Boat, and Study in Movement.

1932              Lucy's modern canvases are noted by The New York Times in the NYSWA's first exhibition in their
                      permanent gallery in the Squibb Building in New York in January. William exhibits Two Dancers in Black
                      and Rest at an exhibition of work by men in the NYSWA's gallery in March, which are both noted in The
                      New York Times as "excellent figure themes" (March 5, 1932).

                      William and Lucy participate in the exhibition Theatre in Art at the Sidney Ross Gallery in New York in
                      April-May. William's Two Dancers in Black and Lucy's Dance Composition are singled out in The New York
                      Times review (April 21, 1932).

                      William serves on the jury for the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition. Lucy exhibits two paintings from
                      their recent trip to Mexico: Plaza, Taxco and Domes of Cholula. William exhibits a painting titled
                      Composition.

1933              William has an exhibition of paintings, watercolors, and drawings at Montross Gallery, New York in March.
                      The exhibition includes Mexican and New England subjects, as well as drawings of dancers. Art News
                      (March 5, 1933) reproduces The Cove, a painting of bathers at a pier, and Town and Country (March 15,
                      1933) reproduces Peons, an image of workers inspired by the L'Engles' trip to Mexico in 1932. The
                      exhibition is given a full review in The New York Times (March 5, 1933).

                      William exhibits the watercolor Dance Group in a traveling group exhibition The Dance in Modern Art,
                      which opens at the Reinhardt Galleries in New York in December. The exhibition is organized by the
                      College Art Association and includes both American and European artists, including: Ivan Albright, Milton
                      Avery, Arthur B. Davies, Guy Pène du Bois, Ernest Fiene, Robert Henri, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Reginald Marsh,
                      Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, and Max Weber.

                      William L'Engle exhibits Fishermen and Street Music in the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition. Lucy
                      exhibits two paintings and four drawings.

1934              William and Lucy participate in the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts' annual exhibition.

                      Lucy exhibits in the annual exhibition of the NYSWA in February at the Squibb Building.

                      Lucy exhibits her prints in a group exhibition at Weyhe Gallery in May.

1935              Lucy exhibits in the 10th annual exhibition of the NYSWA at the Squibb Building in February.

                      At the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition, William exhibits Track Meet (now in the Town Collection of
                      Provincetown) and Lucy exhibits 5 paintings titled: Car Barns, New York; Clam Diggers; Houses; In
                      Wellfleet; Church Tower, Wellfleet
.

                      William has an exhibition of watercolors and drawings at Georgette Passedoit Gallery, New York from
                      November 1 through 15. His watercolor House and Tree is reproduced in the "Current Exhibitions" section
                      of Parnassus's November issue and fully reviewed in the magazine's December issue. The New York
                      Times gives a strong review of the exhibition calling him "an artist's artist" and says his work "reveals
                      anew his preoccupation with rhythms, aesthetically logical constructions, ability to abstract." (Howard
                      Devree, Nov.10, 1935)

1936              William exhibits at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Art Institute of Chicago.
                      Lucy exhibits in the annual exhibition of the NYSWA in January at the Squibb Building.

                      One of Lucy's eight entries in the PAA's Modernist annual exhibition, The Street, is reproduced in The New
                      York Times (August 16, 1936) in an article on the Provincetown art scene.

1937              William serves on jury for the Combined (Modernist and Conservative) exhibition of the PAA, where the
                      modernists hang their art on one side of the gallery and the conservatives on the other. Both William and
                      Lucy exhibit paintings on the modern wall from their recent trip to Cuba.

                      Lucy exhibits in the NYSWA's annual exhibition at the Squibb Building in January.

                      Yale University acquires A Hill Town by William.

1938              Lucy exhibits a Cuban landscape at the NYSWA's annual exhibition at the Squibb Building in February.

                      William exhibits 1 painting and Lucy exhibits 6 in the PAA's annual exhibition.

1939              William is selected to participate in the New York World's Fair exhibition Art Today and exhibits the
                      painting Cement Workers. The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquires William's watercolor, Figure
                      Composition
, as part of its effort to acquire modern American paintings. The work goes on view in the
                      Metropolitan Museum's Special Exhibition Gallery from November to January 1940 in the exhibition of new
                      acquisitions, Paintings by Modern American Artists.

                      Lucy's lithographs receive attention in The New York Times in a group print exhibition by twenty artists at
                      the Grant Studios, New York in January.

                      William and Lucy exhibit in the PAA's annual exhibition in July and Lucy exhibits two works - Winding
                      Road
and After the Fair - at the PAA in August.

1940              William and Lucy spend the winter in St. Augustine, Florida. William holds an active role in the Arts Club
                      of St. Augustine in the 1940s, advocating the importance of modern art. Under his guidance the group's
                      exhibitions became more diverse in style, including a Blanche Lazzell print show in 1944.

                      William has an exhibition of oil paintings at Georgette Passedoit Gallery, New York from March 11 through
                      23. A portrait of his daughter titled Mady is reproduced in The New York Times (March 17, 1940). Fish
                      Composition
is reproduced in Art News (March 16, 1940).

                      Lucy exhibits a landscape with the NYSWA at the American Art Today Building at the New York World's
                      Fair from September 24 to October 11. She also participates in the group's annual exhibition in February
                      at the Grant Studios.

1941              Lucy's landscape of Provincetown dunes is noted in The New York Times review of the NYSWA annual at
                      the Riverside Museum in September.

1942              The Whitney Museum of American Art purchases a painting by William from the PAA's annual exhibition.

1945              William curates an exhibition on Martin Johnson Heade, then in obscurity, at the Arts Club of St.
                      Augustine. The exhibition includes 27 paintings and sketches from Florida collections.

                      Lucy receives recognition in The New York Times (Oct. 14, 1945) for her watercolor On the Jetty in the
                      NYSWA's annual exhibition at the Riverside Museum.

1946              In November, William and Lucy participate in an exhibition of the PAA at Jacques Seligmann Gallery in
                      New York. Lucy and William both exhibit abstractions and landscapes.

1947              Lucy participates in a four-woman show at the Studio Gallery in New York.

1949              Lucy's abstractions at the NYSWA's annual exhibition at the Riverside Museum in November are noted in
                      The New York Times (Nov. 13, 1949).

1951              Lucy has a solo exhibition of paintings, including many Florida gouaches, at the Wellons Gallery, New
                      York in October.

1956              William and Lucy have a joint exhibition at Bodley Gallery, New York in October. Lucy exhibits collages of
                      broken antique glass and William exhibits watercolors of Romanesque sculpture he saw in France and
                      Spain.

1957              Death of William.

1960              Memorial exhibition for William at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

1961              Lucy shows William's work at his studio, now the L'Engle Studio Gallery.

1978              Death of Lucy.

© D. Wigmore Fine Art, Inc.

[ TOP ]

730 Fifth Avenue, Suite 602, New York, NY 10019  |  212-581-1657  |  info@dwigmore.com

Monday–Friday 10am–6pm  |  About Us